The Nyding

Physical locations, be they ports, nations, counties, cities, towns, shipyards, dockyards, islands, lakes, oceans or anything else related to the see.
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jon_ystrad
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The Nyding

Post by jon_ystrad »

Please can anyone tell me exactly what/where the Nyding is? I am thinking it is part of the Sound or the Kattegat from context.

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Jon
Grammont
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Re: The Nyding

Post by Grammont »

The New and Complete Cattegat Pilot [1803] states:

NYDING Island, on the Swedish Coast, lies about 16 leagues S.E.S. from the Scaw; from Wingo Beacon the course is S.E. 7 leagues: the Tiflarne Rocks lie in the same direction, three leagues from the beacon, and must be carefully avoided.

On the island of Nyding are erected two Coal-lights. By day this island is very easily known, by a tower which stands on it, painted red, and likewise a large red house close to it. In the tower there is a large bell, which is rung in foggy weather. From Nyding two reefs run out, one to the S.W. which only extends about a quarter of a mile; the other, called Lilland, extends about a mile to the eastward; on this the sea breaks constantly with the least wind.

The modern spelling of the placename is Nidingen.
Navclio
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Re: The Nyding

Post by Navclio »

"-en" in the Scandinavian languages (well, I don't know about Faeroese or Icelandic, but in Danish, Swedish, and Norwegian) is a "definite" suffix or "enclitic definite article," so "Nidingen" just means "The Niding." Although the English are notorious for garbling foreign place and personal names, "Nyding" is pretty close, and might even have been "Nyding" in Danish at the beginning of the 19th century.
Grammont
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Re: The Nyding

Post by Grammont »

Navclio wrote: Thu May 20, 2021 5:26 am "-en" in the Scandinavian languages (well, I don't know about Faeroese or Icelandic, but in Danish, Swedish, and Norwegian) is a "definite" suffix or "enclitic definite article," so "Nidingen" just means "The Niding." Although the English are notorious for garbling foreign place and personal names, "Nyding" is pretty close, and might even have been "Nyding" in Danish at the beginning of the 19th century.
In 1624 when the first lighthouse was built the island was Danish and only became Swedish territory after the Peace of Brömsebro in 1645. As a 1541 reference refers to either Nyding or Niding it is certainly the Danish spelling for the place.

https://www.gof.nu/nidingen/historia_1.html
jon_ystrad
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Re: The Nyding

Post by jon_ystrad »

Thank you! So it is here

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nidingen#/map/0

Right alongside the Swedish coast

The article I was using was:-
"Extract of a Letter from Elsineur, dated Dec 8
"I am glad to advise with certainty that M. Thurot got to Bergen the 17th ult. and remained there on the 20th with only three Ships of his Squadron, and a small Prize, the other three having been separated from him in a Gale of Wind, and thought to be put into Port more to the Northward; he was supposed to remain in Harbour till they could all be assembled. His Majesty's Sloop Grampus joined Captain Gough off the Nyding the 4th instant. An English Man of War, as well as Mr Allemes was at Mandal eight Days ago."

Is Mandal also a place in this area?
Grammont
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Re: The Nyding

Post by Grammont »

jon_ystrad
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Re: The Nyding

Post by jon_ystrad »

Thank you. Getting to grips with where these places are helps put the news reports of the Baltic trade convoys into a proper geographical perspective
Grammont
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Re: The Nyding

Post by Grammont »

One thing that complicates things is occasionally you can have placenames in the Scandinavian countries referred to using the Hanseatic League (German) version of the placename. I once had a British document refer to Drontheim in Norway. Gazetteers and maps gave no clues to where it was. Eventually I discovered that Drontheim is what the Germans call Trondheim (they are actually anagrams).
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